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Old 10-07-2016, 08:43 PM
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tassievteclude tassievteclude is offline
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Location: Tasmania, Australia
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Re: :::Tassievteclude::: Tassie's 1994 JDM BB1

Diet time.

I've spent the last few weeks finding ways to shed some extra weight from the old girl. The sunroof is an obvious place to start, I didn't want to resort to riveting in a sheet of aluminium or try to make a fibreglass plug at this stage, and there is practically no such thing as a sunroofless Prelude in Aus to swap the roof from, so I made up a couple of Aluminium brackets to hold the stock panel in place.

The old bulky frame.



The new aluminium bracket.



A better view.



The frame and motor weigh a total of around 7.5kg, and the brackets I made weigh a little over 250g each, so around a 7kg saving for the sake of a day or two messing around. The stock panel itself weighs around 6kg though so I could still save a little more here by cutting out the bracing. My panel is rusted quite badly though and is starting to bubble again despite my efforts to save it a few months back. As it turns out the stock panel doesn't not leak either which is why there is a gutter and drains underneath it. Even after fiddling around with the positioning a little I have some sizable gaps around the panel still, not sure what I'm going to do there except not drive in the rain. Looks like long term I'll be replacing the whole thing though.

The sunroof panel still appears to sit in the stock location.



But on closer inspection.



I bought myself a spot weld remover, nifty little drill bit that will only drill one layer of steel where two are spot welded together. Handy for removing random brackets and the like without drilling holes straight through the bodywork. Managed nearly half a kilo more here before I smashed all the teeth off the bit, a less gung-ho attitude is necessary here.

For instance, the jack bracket removed.



Then the fun job, removing body deadener. This should be easy they say, it'll only take an hour they say, you'll save so much weight they say. Yeah right. This was one of the most tedious and uncomfortable jobs I've done on this car to date. Before I started.



So, using dry ice of course, I could get some decent sized chunks of the deadener to come out of the boot and from under the back seats with relative ease. The hard part was the main floor pan itself. Some parts would come away easily but there were sections where the lovely folk at Honda had spilled seam sealer on the floor pan before putting the deadener mat down. The deadener would go brittle with the cold but would still be stuck to the excess sealer. Half a day with a hammer and chisel and the pan was uncovered.



It took a few more days of tedious work to get the rest of the excess seam sealer off. All this work saved only around 6kg of weight.

Once finished, cleaned and reassembled.



I had also taken the opportunity to take out the main harness and strip out some of the extra wiring for options I don't have any more. There is still much more to come out but to date I've saved over 5kg in weight just in wiring (I've kept it all).

So for all that work I've managed about 15kg of weight savings. I'm going to have to dig much deeper to get more. I'm starting to think about things like lightweight heater cores, composite panels and fibreglass seats. Much further and I'll just be cutting out steel bracing from the body meaning I'll just be adding weight to get the chassis rigidity back up. There are a few emissions related items I can probably remove from the engine bay but they're not going to shave much. I still have to do the battery relocation but even with a lightweight battery this is really just moving weight around not removing it, given the extra weight the cable itself adds. If I ever go so far as to get a cage (I probably should) then I can save a fair bit this way but I don't think it'd be enough to offset the weight of the cage itself.
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